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A new study from Silkroad Technology and OnePoll found bosses and their employees have very different opinions of how their company handled the pandemic. (Photo by Amy Hirschi on Unsplash)

Two in five office workers plan to resign and take a new job as soon as they can because of their company’s response to the pandemic, new research revealed.

The study of 1,500 office workers (many of whom are now working remotely) and 500 C-suite level executives examined the differing perceptions between the two groups when it came to their companies’ pivots as a result of COVID-19.

Eighty-six percent of C-suite respondents thought their organization demonstrated commitment to their employees during the pandemic.

That was in stark contrast to one-third (35%) of office workers who said they could not agree with a statement saying they felt valued as an employee, based on their employer’s response to the pandemic. …


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According to a study commissioned by Garnier hair color and conducted by OnePoll, 65% believe they’ve aged more during 2020 than in a normal year — due to stress from the pandemic. (Photo by George Bohunicky on Unsplash)

The average American woman feels she’s aged almost four years over the course of 2020, according to new research.

A survey of 2,000 American women found 65% believe they’ve aged more during 2020 than in a normal year — due to stress from the pandemic.

And that’s affected their appearance, too: 52% of respondents believe they’ve gone gray faster during quarantine than they would have otherwise.

Results revealed 42% have found new gray hairs during quarantine, and of those, 46% said they found their FIRST gray hair while stuck at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Commissioned by Garnier hair color and conducted by OnePoll, the survey delved into women’s hair color during the pandemic, looking past gray hair to see what style changes they made in 2020. …


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According to a study conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Vida Health, a third of Americans (31%) either continued or returned to therapy over the last year. (Photo by Noah Silliman on Unsplash)

How difficult was 2020? Enough that more than one out of every six Americans started therapy for the first time, new research suggests.

According to a recent study of 2,000 U.S. adults, these therapy converts join the third of Americans (31%) who’d either continued or returned to therapy over the last year.

Fifteen percent are also taking medication for mental health for the first time as of 2020, and another 15% have changed or increased an existing prescription during that same time frame.

Despite this, many Americans still appear to hold conflicting beliefs and stigmas about mental health treatment — 47%, for example, believe that seeking therapy is a sign of weakness. …


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New research conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Crockpot reveals how different personality types have been dealing with the pandemic (Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash).

Those who are more laid-back are adjusting better to quarantine life — and are more optimistic overall, new research found.

The survey of 2,000 Americans — split by those who move slowly, versus those who do things quickly — found respondents who take their time could not only adapt more easily to life at home (38% vs. 25%), but they were also more likely to see the bright side of situations.

Conducted by OnePoll and commissioned by Crockpot for National Slow Cooking Month in January, the survey looked at a variety of personality differences between the two groups.

Results revealed those who take their time were more likely to consider themselves introverts, while those who move quickly identified most commonly as ambiverts. …


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Commissioned by Melio and conducted by OnePoll, the survey also revealed that many respondents were able to adapt and even evolve during the pandemic, by rethinking the way they operate their businesses. Photo by Patrick Tomasso on Unsplash

Thirty-one percent of small business owners said embracing new technology helped their business during COVID-19, according to new research.

The survey of 1,000 small business owners revealed that for 25% of respondents, the pandemic accelerated the adoption of digital tools for their business.

While the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on small businesses are far-reaching, results revealed a cautiously optimistic forecast — likely due in part to business owners’ quick thinking.

The survey found once they’re able to resume business as usual, the average respondent believes the adverse effects of COVID-19 will be negligible within a year.

While 57% of respondents said COVID-19 had a “somewhat” or “very” negative impact on their small business, 7% reported a positive impact and 36% reported the pandemic had no impact on their business. …


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According to a survey by OnePoll on behalf of Credit Sesame, respondents’ top financial goal for themselves is to build up their savings, closely followed by paying down their credit card debt. Photo by 金 运 on Unsplash

Over half of Americans are experiencing a financial hangover due to their holiday spending, according to new research.

The study asked 2,000 census-balanced Americans about how their finances have been impacted by the perfect storm of COVID-19 and the holidays and found it will take them nearly seven weeks to get their finances back on track in the new year after the holiday season.

It’s no surprise then that 64% of respondents regret not handling their money better over the course of 2020.

Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Credit Sesame, results revealed the average respondent picked up five bad financial habits during the pandemic. …


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Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Omega-3 supplement Kori Pure Antarctic Krill Oil, the survey found that 71% of Americans couldn’t identify the right number of daily servings required from each food group. Photo by Ella Olsson on Unsplash

Sixty-four percent of Americans aged 25–45 feel physically older than their actual age, according to new research.

Yet mentally, 73% feel younger than they really are.

Given the sense of an older physical age, it’s no surprise that four in 10 say that they have aches and pains with no identifiable source — seven of them, on average.

Does all this perceived premature aging strengthen Americans’ belief in the adage that “youth is wasted on the young?” For 55% of respondents, the answer is yes.

The study also examined why respondents might be feeling older than their real age.

Four in 10 admitted the top struggle of growing up is being responsible for their physical health, including making their own doctor’s appointments. …


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New research conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Circle revealed families may be taking a tech break during 2021 (Photo by Alexander Dummer on Unsplash).

Nearly seven in 10 American parents believe it’s important for their families to take a break from technology in the new year, according to new research.

A survey of 2,000 American parents asked how parents witness tech burnout in their children and how they plan to improve their family’s digital well-being in the new year.

When asked what the effective tools are for managing stress in children, parents responded with tactics like taking a break from screens when they need it, exercising, breathing, dancing, meditating, playing offline games and even knitting.

Commissioned by Circle and conducted by OnePoll, the survey found 77% of respondents believe having their child take a break from technology can vastly improve their mental and emotional health. …


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A new study from Verv and OnePoll examines how the healthy habits people attempted and abandoned in 2020 may impact their progress in 2021. (Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash)

If Americans’ track record for “sticking with it” in 2020 is any indication, keeping New Year’s resolutions may prove more difficult in 2021 than ever before.

The average American tried to form 19 new habits during quarantine — and gave up on all but four of them, according to new research.

A study of 2,000 Americans found that a new exercise routine (34%), a new hobby (31%) and a new cooking regimen (29%) were among the top new habits to try last year.

On the other hand, a new wake-up time (13%), meditation (12%) and going to bed earlier (10%) were the activities most likely to be tried and subsequently abandoned in 2020. …


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New research conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Apple Vacations reveals how much Americans missed traveling this year (Photo by Eva Darron on Unsplash).

Even the TSA is more popular than quarantine, according to new research.

Sixty-three percent of Americans would rather spend three hours every day in a TSA security line than be stuck indoors for the rest of the year.

A new poll asked 2,000 U.S. adults to describe their mental state under current travel restrictions and social distancing guidelines, which were adopted across the country to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Apple Vacations, the study found that 84% said they’ve dearly missed traveling this year, compared to only 4% who said they didn’t.

About

SWNS

SWNS is a UK and US-based news and media content agency with a proud 40-year history.

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