Research reveals the vegetables Americans hate/love to eat

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Research conducted by OnePoll on behalf of www.VeggieTracker.com from Dr. Praeger’s aimed to reveal exactly how Americans feel about each vegetable. (Photo by Sharon Pittaway on Unsplash)

According to a new poll, America’s favorite vegetable has been crowned — and it may not be what you expect.

A new survey of 2,000 Americans officially crowned our favorite vegetable and the new king of veggies is…corn!

Cracking the top three along with corn, which yielded 91.4 percent of survey respondents saying they liked it, were potatoes (91.2 percent), barely missing out on the No. 1 spot. Carrots and tomatoes tied for third at 89 percent.

The new survey, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of www.VeggieTracker.com from Dr. Praeger’s aimed to reveal exactly how Americans feel about each vegetable, and to get a glimpse inside our veggie eating habits.

Onions and green beans, both at 87 percent, received high marks as well. Surprisingly, broccoli barely cracked the top ten, coming in at number eight on the list, with 85 percent saying they liked it.

So we know our favorite veggies, but what are the veggies we refuse to eat even if they’re coated in cheese or ranch dressing?

According to the results of the poll, our most hated veggie is the turnip with 27 percent of the respondents reporting that they disliked it.

Beets (26 percent) and radishes (23 percent) also broke the top three of our least liked veggies, with Brussels sprouts also scoring high (21 percent.)

But that’s not all the survey figured out. One of the most shocking revelations within the results was that over one in four respondents (25 percent) say they’ve actually never eaten a vegetable.

And of those who do eat vegetables, only a third of their meals (36 percent) actually include a vegetable as part of it.

Said Larry Praeger, CEO of Dr. Praeger’s: “Most of us already know they should be eating more vegetables. While more and more people are adopting plant-based diets, there’s still a long way to go toward reaching recommended consumption levels.”

But Americans are at least trying to eat more vegetables, as 72 percent of Americans say they wish they ate more veggies than they currently do.

Not only that, 67 percent of Americans say they feel guilty when they fail to eat vegetables with their meal.

So, what’s holding them back? The biggest reason Americans don’t eat more vegetables is because their produce rots before they get a chance to eat it (25 percent).

One in four Americans say that vegetables simply cost too much, with 22 percent saying they take too much time to prepare and one in five saying they don’t how to cook them properly.

Said Larry Praeger, CEO of Dr. Praeger’s: “Eating veggies should be fun and rewarding! This is why we created www.veggietracker.com; to give people free tools and resources to help them fall in love with veggies and build eating habits that last a lifetime.”

AMERICA’S TOP 10 FAVORITE VEGGIES

  1. Corn 91%
  2. Potatoes 91%
  3. Carrots 89%
  4. Tomatoes 89%
  5. Onion 87%
  6. Green beans 87%
  7. Cucumbers 86%
  8. Broccoli 85%
  9. Cabbage 84%
  10. Peas 83%
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AMERICA’S TOP 10 LEAST FAVORITE VEGGIES

  1. Turnip 27%
  2. Beets 26%
  3. Radish 23%
  4. Brussels sprouts 21%
  5. Artichoke 20%
  6. Eggplant 20%
  7. Butternut squash 20%
  8. Zucchini 18%
  9. Mushroom 18%
  10. Asparagus 16%
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TOP 5 REASONS AMERICANS DON’T EAT VEGGIES MORE

  1. They always rot before I get a chance to eat them 25%
  2. They’re too expensive 25%
  3. I don’t have convenient access to buying them 24%
  4. They take too much time to prepare 22%
  5. I don’t know how to cook them properly 19%

>> Download the video & infographic for this research story <<

NOTE: All news copy and multimedia on this SWNS account is free to use as you see fit. Where research has been conducted, we ask that you credit the company which commissioned it.

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